We R the Cure

Seeking Cures and Cheating Destiny


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JDRF Research News: Specific Protein May Help Beta Cells Survive in Type 1 Diabetes

JDRF-funded researchers find therapeutic potential of MANF protein to reduce beta cell stress in type 1 diabetes.

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I am a diabetes advocate. We R the Cure is a blog site dedicated to the persons living with Type 1 diabetes and the clincial researchers who are making positive things happen in our journey to a cure.

In the healthy pancreas of someone without type 1 diabetes (T1D), the hormone insulin (essential for turning food into energy) is produced, stored, and released in a normal “factory-like” process within pancreatic beta cells in response to glucose in the diet.

Early in the course of T1D, however, excessive or pathologic stress in beta cells compromises their ability to properly secrete insulin, triggering a cascade of events ultimately contributing to the beta cell death. Over the past several years, JDRF-funded researchers have found evidence that beta cell stress may play a role in the onset of T1D, and are exploring possible ways to stop it from occurring, thus potentially protecting beta cell health and maintaining normal beta cell function.

In April, JDRF-funded researchers in Finland released new findings in the journal CellPress that add another piece to the puzzle of beta cell stress and T1D.

Post comes from News release published at  http://www.jdrf.org.


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Turning Type 1 Diabetes into Type None: I’m wearing biker shorts (Ugh) and riding for a cure

Hello Friends and Supporters of Type 1 Diabetes research!

JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes

Why do we ride? We ride to raise research funds so that Daniel Majikes, left, has hope for a brighter future and a real cure for Type 1 diabetes. Daniel and I will ride together in Vermont on July 26.

I’m taking part in the JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes in Vermont this July, along with hundreds of riders from around the world, to raise money for JDRF, the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. My training is designed so I can ride up to 100 miles on a bike — I’m not a cyclist but I am a biker with a mission.

So far, I’m up to 29 miles of weekly bike training and heading toward a busy July riding the back roads of Goochland County — which is a beautiful area to ride. As Jackson Browne sings, “Looking at the road rushing under my wheels … Running on Empty … but I’m running on.”

Click here to visit my personal page.

I received my Type 1D diagnosis — from out of nowhere — in May 1998. That is 16 years this May 2014. It’s been a real up-and-down journey since that unfortunate starting line when my fasting blood sugar was 500+ as I sat in the exam room at Chester Family Physicians.

Today, 16 years later, I count only my blessings for all the good things that have happened to me on my journey to a cure. It’s the Type 1D people — Drew, Lauri, Daniel, Linda, Matthew, William, Susan, Fred, Tony, Kevin, Patti, Trish, Shea, Sarah, JP, Liesl, Molly, Mary, Laura, Boris, Danny, Sue, Stacy, Nicole, Kathy, Ned, Chris, Eva, Cecil, Cheryl, Larry, Melanie, Kim, Hillary, Doran, McKenzie, Sandra, Connie, Kailee, Nathan, Tom, Kim, Tiffany, Andrew and all my fellow JDRF volunteers too numerous to list — that’s why we ride.

We do ALL this for each other. We do it for ourselves. We do it for our friends and loved ones. We do it for my aunt Mary Jane, a Joslin Medalist who’s lived with Type 1 Diabetes for 70+ years and is still kicking – despite having both feet amputated due to diabetes complications. And we do it for the next generation of children and adults who have not been diagnosed yet.

Today, I’m making my biggest commitment yet. I have joined Coach Matthew Majikes and the Central Virginia Ride to Cure Diabetes team. Our goal is simple: To train together as a team, enjoy our time together, and cycle up to 100 miles in Burlington, Vermont July 24-27 to raise awareness and dollars for research that will improve the quality of life for children, teens and adults living with this chronic disease.  And one day soon — our efforts will generate a quality of life cure like the Artificial Pancreas and the ultimate goal, a medical cure that reverses or stops Type 1 diabetes in its tracks.

Will you help me on my road to a cure?

JDRF is working every day to fund critical diabetes research. And every dollar I raise helps them continue to bring life-changing therapies from the lab to the community until a cure is found. I’m  entering my second month of training on my bike. Please check back to view my fundraising progress as my Ride weekend approaches.

Can you make a donation of $25, $30 or more today? Your support, both financially and emotionally, is greatly appreciated. Please consider making an online donation today. Thank you. Together, We Are The Cure.

Mike Anderson

Click here to visit my personal page.


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Should Type 1 Diabetes Advocates Have Sharp Elbows? Status Quo or Act Up — What is the right pathway?

What does advocacy mean? Is someone who advocates for a cause they believe in — not to be confused with a paid advocate — actually able to make things better, to make change happen at a local, regional or national level? Well, it’s time to find out.

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I am a new member of Diabetes Advocates. Excited to be an advocate. What can we achieve together?

I did not prepare a speech, but I am very honored and excited to have my membership application accepted by the Diabetes Advocates non-profit group. Thank you to the Academy!

The question for me to answer is — how do I actively participate and how do I add my time and voice to the growing chorus of Diabetes Online Community (#DOC) leaders who are real people, not actors on TV, who wake up each day with Type 1 Diabetes and envision a better future for themselves and the next generation of Americans who get this game-changing diagnosis. The DOC has done great things for all of us connected to diabetes.

Are we advocates or practical agitators. Or something in between? The recent article in Insulin Nation about The Juvenile Diabetes Cure Alliance (JDCA) — Practical Cure Advocates — should make all of us stop and think. What change do we advocate for? If we want more human clinical trials, higher-tech technology and a medical cure for Type 1 diabetes — it’s up to us to make it happen.

“Scientists have made careers in proving a concept in mice…we want to push against that gravitational pull” of mouse-only research, Phil Shaw of the JDCA told Insulin Nation.

I’ve been a volunteer and fundraiser for many years with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation — the Central Virginia Chapter. Thru my volunteer work I’ve met some incredible children, teens, adults and selfless parents — and developed friendships with some of the best people I’ve ever met — the people you wish you never had the good fortune to meet. I’ve also been a participant in and an advocate for human clinical trials, and I see how the money raised for Type 1 research does make a difference in our daily lives. However, no matter how hard we all push, we’re still waiting for  better tech, better solutions and a future free from Type 1.

For today, it is my honor to be a new DA and to proudly post the group’s goals. Tomorrow is a new day. Together we are stronger.

Diabetes Advocates is a program of the Diabetes Hands Foundation, a nonprofit organization that brings together people touched by diabetes for positive change so that nobody living with this condition ever feels alone.

Mission
To connect advocates dedicated to improving the lives of people living with diabetes in order to accelerate and amplify their efforts

Goals 2013-2015
1. Continue growing the reach and impact of the program, by:

  • Creating paths for diabetes advocacy for members of the diabetes online community.
  • Increasing the number of Diabetes Advocates members focused on type 2 diabetes.
  • Increasing the number of Spanish-speaking Diabetes Advocates members.
  • Increasing awareness about Diabetes Advocates, starting with an emphasis in the US.

2. Increase the measurable impact of the program through:

  • Increasing member engagement in Diabetes Advocates initiatives.
  • Expanding benefits that impact sustainability and member development.
  • Hosting an annual Diabetes Advocacy Congress.
  • Consolidate Diabetes Advocates as a hub for collaboration among diabetes advocates.


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Encapsulated Cell Therapy Aims to Transform, Cure Type 1 Diabetes? ViaCyte’s Human Clinical Trials Coming In 2014

BETHESDA, MD (March 1, 2014) — Well, there you go again. Getting your hopes up for another possible ” cure” for Type 1 Diabetes. That’s what I told myself as I listened to Dr. Eugene Brandon, Ph.D. — an obviously intelligent scientist who was also able to speak in layman’s language — present his case at the JDRF Research Summit hosted by the Greater Chesapeake & Potomac Chapter of JDRF last Saturday.

As I listened and tried to understand the science behind his talk, it was difficult to stay realistic. If they can implant regenerative cells under the skin and these cells will function like  healthy pancreatic cells, then this crazy idea just might work for some children or adults living with T1Ds. So my next question was: When is the first human clinical trial and how do I sign up? Damn the risks; my time is running out. That’s what went through my mind and probably a few others listening to him speak.

Before I booked my flight to San Diego, I settled down and realized one simple fact: I’m attending a diabetes research summit where “hope” is always the key word. Dr. Brandon,  Director of Strategic Relations & Project Management at San-Diego based ViaCyte, spoke to a full ballroom of  T1Ds and their families at the Bethesda North Marriott during the 4th annual JDRF Research Summit.  Dr. Brandon talked about his company’s VC-01™ combination product. It is a stem cell-derived, cell therapy product that the company believes could transform the way patients with Type 1 diabetes manage their disease.

The product is comprised of pancreatic progenitor cells contained in a proprietary device that is designed to be inserted under the skin.  Upon implant, the product is expected to vascularize as the cells further differentiate to islet-like structures that generate insulin and other expected regulatory factors in response to blood glucose levels, essentially providing patients with a replacement for the cells lost as a result of the disease. The company has reviewed the VC-01™ combination product development plans with regulatory authorities at the US Food and Drug Agency and Health Canada.

By acting essentially as a replacement endocrine pancreas, the source of insulin and other regulatory hormones produced in our bodies, VC-01 combination product has the potential to be a virtual cure for type 1 diabetes. The VC-01 therapy is the combination of:

  • PEC-01 cells: A proprietary pancreatic endoderm cell product derived through directed differentiation of an inexhaustible human embryonic stem cell line, and
  • Encaptra drug delivery system: A proprietary immune-protecting and retrievable encapsulation medical device.

Pending regulatory authority review of its planned application, ViaCyte is planning to initiate clinical development in patients with Type 1 diabetes this year!  As he finished his presentation, Dr. Brandon answered a few of the lingering questions from the optimistic but realistic Type 1 Summit attendees.

The testing has worked in mice. But is it safe for humans?

“By all accounts, it is a stable product. Our testing shows it stays stable for the life of the animal,” Brandon said. “If we can get this biological process to work, we think we can replace the damaged islets.” The company also has developed a process for inserting and removing the implanted device quickly. “Something like this has never been tested in humans before.”

When will human clinical trials begin?

“We think we’ll be in pretty good shape to get this ready and approved by FDA for a first human trial planned in 2014,” Brandon said, adding that his company has already held discussions with the FDA on their proposed timeline. “You don’t want to spring something like this on the FDA.”

What is the lifecycle of the implanted device? 

“That is the million dollar question to be determined in the clinical trial,” Brandon said. “How long will this last if it works?” Because the cells are contained in a ” tea bag” type of container, it is anticipated that the body’s immune system will not strike or reject the foreign object. “Theoretically, these implants could last for many years.  That is the purpose of the clinical trials. We will start learning things that can only be discovered in a human clinical trial.”

At the end of the summit, I left with renewed hope for a cure and the sober realization that this chase for a miracle is nothing new to persons living with all types of deadly diseases. In fact, the JDRF was formed 40+ years ago by parents of children with Type 1 diabetes who were committed to pushing faster to fund a cure.  In seeking a cure, we all jump into the fountain of scientific hope. Compared to the quality of life for diabetics before the discovery of insulin in 1921, Type 1 diabetics are living in a golden age of scientific and technology success. Things are improving at a rapid pace. So we keep chasing the illusion and hope to cheat our destiny for one more hour, for one more day, for one more year. Until there’s a cure … we march on.


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2013 Blogging Year In Review: Thanks For Visiting We R The Cure

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,200 times in 2013. If it were a cable car, it would take about 37 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.


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Clinical Studies Are Recruiting for Participants; We R the Cure — Is It Your Time?

A clinical study involves research using human volunteers (also called participants) that is intended to add to medical knowledge.

Before leaving UVa and giving back the AP, I pose with a few of the team members who watched over me and conducted the outpatient trial. L to R: my nurse, Crystal Leathers, computer engineer Benton MIze, and Stacey Anderson, MD.

Before leaving UVa and giving back the AP, I pose with a few of the team members who watched over me and conducted the outpatient trial. L to R: my nurse, Crystal Leathers, computer engineer Benton Mize, and Stacey Anderson, MD.

There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials and observational studies. ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational studies.

Searching for a Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial? Check out the current list of trials in the United States.  Searching for a Type 2 diabetes clinical trial?  Click this link.


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Researchers Agree: The Status Quo Is Not Acceptable; We Need More Clinical Trial Participants To Drive Progress

Imagine my surprise and excitement when a leading Type 1 diabetes researcher, Dr. Desmond Schatz of the University of Florida, unofficially promoted our “We R The Cure” blog site during the JDRF Type 1 Diabetes Research Summit on Feb. 18, 2012. Let’s roll the audio tape:

We R the cure JDRF walk team

We R the Cure — and so are you. Sign up for a clinical trial today.

“We do not have enough people participating in research studies,” Dr. Schatz told several hundred Type 1D enthusiasts in his opening statements. “My goal is to give you hope, to inspire hope, and to push you to get involved. Without U, there can be no cure.” Almost on cue, an outburst of applause came from the adjacent ballroom where young children with Type 1 diabetes were playing and having fun while their parents attended the JDRF Summit. Dr. Schatz heard the applause and laughed. “I am here to make it clear, that the status quo (in Type 1 research) is unacceptable!” And again, the children cheered right on cue.

This blog is dedicated to the patients, doctors, nurses, researchers and big thinkers who are actively pushing research forward – in our search for solutions & cures for persons living with auto immune disorders such as type 1 diabetes and certain forms of cancer that are tied indirectly to weakened immune systems or a virus attack. If you’re ready to learn more or join a clinical trial, check back here often for news and information. Or simply click on Clinical Trials to get started.

My name is Mike Anderson, and I am the creator and editor of We R The Cure. I received my Type 1D diagnosis — from out of nowhere — in May 1998. Together with my friends and family, I am a passionate advocate for raising awareness and raising dollars for research and real solutions that will improve the quality of life for children, teens and adults living with this chronic disease. And one day — A cure or many cures.

A clinical study involves research using human volunteers (also called participants) that is intended to add to medical knowledge.  There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials and observational studies.    ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational studies. So, what R U waiting for … Think about joining a clinical trial in 2014. It’s a new year’s resolution that is worth keeping. Thanks for your participation. werthecure.com


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Resolutions To Keep In 2014: One Small Step For Man, One Giant Leap … For Diabetes Awareness

Welcome back to We R The Cure, 2014 Edition. I am happy to be back among the Diabetes Online Community.

Artificial Pancreas Closed Loop System

Artificial Pancreas Closed Loop System

Yes, I’ve been away enjoying Christmas, New Year’s, working, searching for new work and — most importantly, focusing on what matters the most to me: Family, Friends and Faith. If you guessed that what matters most is my Type 1 D, well — you were close but wrong. Of course, it should have been a multiple choice answer.

If you are a person living with Type 1 diabetes, managing your sugar highs and lows is  ALWAYS on the list of what matters most. Healthy and active on the outside; dealing with a chronic, life-threatening disease on the inside. It is a frustrating condition for the 3 million Americans — toddlers, children, teens and young adults — living with it.

A new year is here, and it’s time for me to join the “New Year Resolutions” chorus and to get my editorial content calendar back ON THE GRID. So here goes my Top 5 list of what We R The Cure will focus on in 2014. Of course, the numerical ranking may switch or slide during the year. What is number 1 today, may be number 2 by year’s end. But you get the idea.

  1. Tell the story of my Aunt Mary Jane.  A Joslin Center Medalist who’s been living with Type 1 diabetes for 7 decades and is still waiting for the cure they promised her back in the 1940s. She’s a survivor who has lived the ups and downs of diabetes since the age of 7. She’s got a story to tell.
  2. The focus of ” We ” R The Cure is the amazing Type 1s, the researchers, the doctors, and the clinical teams pushing hard to bring tech solutions like the Artificial Pancreas to market. The focus is on all clinical trial participants. If you are participating in a clinical trial and want to tell your story — please contact me. Your story needs to be told. And we need to encourage more Type 1Ds to seek and participate in clinical trials. We need more guinea pigs.
  3. Research and technology “News that we can use.” As a former reporter, my job is to highlight and interpret the daily digest of exciting and confusing news surrounding Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.
  4. Wearing My new DexCom 4 and, hopefully, the DexCom 5 in Clinical Trials at the Center for Diabetes Technology at UVA. The DexCom 5 will send its results directly to the Artificial Pancreas smartphone and not to the transmitter. This must be tested and proven successful before “Home” AP trials can begin in 2014.
  5. Biking for the Cure in 2014. Finally putting this on my ” bucket list” and doing it. The target goal: Riding 60 or 100 miles, raising money for diabetes research, and keeping a journal about my training and crossing the finish line.

 

OK, there it is. I’ve placed my resolutions and goals online. WeRThe Cure is ready for another year — year 16 — of balancing life and diabetes. With the love and support of my spouse, family and friends — 2014 will be another great year.

Thanks for reading. Please comment or share ideas or stories.

Mike Anderson


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Diabetes Technology: What Patients Really Want — The Video


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Why Do We Need Type 1 Research? Meet Molly: She Is A Diabetes Advocate Who Almost Became A Diabetes Statistic

I want you to meet Molly. She’s a CDE and clinical nurse trial coordinator at the Center for Diabetes Technology at the University of Virginia School Of Medicine. She’s a type 1 herself who works with the famous Dr. Boris Kovatchev running cutting-edge Artificial Pancreas trials.

UVA Nurse Molly McElwee Malloy

Molly McElwee Malloy

Earlier this year, before you ” met ” Molly — she almost became a statistic. Molly almost died in the early morning hours from a “SH event,” a Severe Hypoglycemic seizure that required EMS intervention and help from a fast-acting spouse. Instead of me trying to retell the story, here’s a link to Molly finally telling her story in her own words in DiabetesMine this August. If you or someone you know lives with Type 1 diabetes, you must read this. Of course, you’ve probably had this happen. My wife has called EMS for me but I have avoided a seizure or trip to the ER.

Here’s a life-and-death detail of Type 1 diabetes:  1 in 20 people, an estimated 2-4 percent and 6 percent in patients younger than 40 years old, will die from severe hypoglycemia.  That’s having a low blood sugar that produces seizures, coma and death. Of the estimated 3 million people in the U.S. with type 1 diabetes, that’s approximately 150,000 people. That’s like wiping out Chattanooga, Tenn. or Rockford, Ill. — wiping them right off the map.

The prevention of a ” hypo event” is a deadly serious issue for T1Ds who strive for tight blood glucose control. That’s the catch-22: The better your control is and the lower your A1cs number is, the better chance you have of avoiding the serious, medical consequences of diabetes ( amputation, heart attack, stokes, and blindness to name a few).

The better your control, however, the higher the likelihood of low-blood sugar events (hypoglycemia).  Wearing Insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) all serve as valuable tools for T1Ds in the quest for tight control. However, reading Molly’s near-fatal “bedtime story” makes it clear to me: even the best informed and compliant PWDs ( persons with diabetes) will experience severe lows and their insulin pumps will continue to infuse insulin until the patient or an attending EMS tech turns it off manually.

That’s where the Artificial Pancreas and its Safety Supervision System can provide real technology solutions. And that’s why the AP must be available and soon.

Severe Hypoglycemia Event Data

Molly’s Severe Hypoglycemia Event.

The figure ( reprinted with permission from Molly) shows the course of her near-death experience and how  the system would have intervened. Sixty minutes before the ” severe hypo” event the safety system would have alerted the patient and stopped insulin. This alert — think of it as your home’s monitoring system — can send a signal to the patient. And if the patient is sleeping or in what I call a ” diabetes fog — unaware of the pending crash.” it could send an alert to a caregiver or spouse via the system’s remote monitoring capability.

I first met Molly in the summer of 2010 when I enrolled in my first AP clinical trial at UVA. Molly, and her trials colleague Mary, are bright, engaging and positive people. Thanks to Molly and Mary, I’ve enjoyed every minute I’ve spent in the UVA trials — as an in-patient and out-patient. And even though Molly reminds me, gleefully, that her alma mater James Madison beat my alma mater, Virginia Tech, in a football game recently in Blacksburg — I can’t imagine going back to UVA in the future and not seeing her smiling face.

Molly gets ” the need” for more clinical trials and why the Artificial Pancreas is so critical to our long-term health. For all T1Ds who wake up at 2 or 3 AM to treat a low blood sugar and sit in the kitchen wondering what happens the next time our sugar drops below 40,  we know why the AP and better technology must be available in the United States. The safety shutoff is available to insulin pump and CGM wearers NOW — in Great Britain. It’s time for the United States to stop leading from behind and move to the front on diabetes technology and research.

Our lives — and Molly’s life — hang in the balance.

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