We R the Cure

Seeking Cures and Cheating Destiny

D-Blogweek Post 2: He’s a poet and don’t know it — For Whom the Bell Tolls

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Yesterday was Poetry Day for Diabetes Blog Week. So, I’m playing catchup already.

Click on the #Dblogweek buttoin

Diabetes Blog Week — Click to find out more details.

Instead of  trying to be a poet, I think it’s wiser to reprint something that fits a certain viewpoint — how Type 1s are living with a chronic disease that ticks, ticks, ticks in the back of our mind. Healthy looking on the outside, not so healthy on the inside.  Seeking Cures and Cheating our Destiny.  And raging against the machine.

No man is an island,
Entire of itself.
Each is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.
If a clod be washed away by the sea,
Europe is the less.
As well as if a promontory were.
As well as if a manor of thine own
Or of thine friend’s were.
Each man’s death diminishes me,
For I am involved in mankind.
Therefore, send not to know
For whom the bell tolls,
It tolls for thee.

These famous words by John Donne were not originally written as a poem – the passage is taken from the 1624 Meditation 17, from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and is prose. The words of the original passage are as follows:

John Donne
Meditation 17
Devotions upon Emergent Occasions

“No man is an iland, intire of it selfe; every man is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine; if a clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were, as well as if a Mannor of thy friends or of thine owne were; any mans death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankinde; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee….”

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Author: werthecure01

Diabetes doesn't define me; it inspires me to define the future for individuals living with autoimmune diseases like Type 1 diabetes. -- Mike Anderson, diagnosed 1998.

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