We R the Cure

Seeking Cures and Cheating Destiny


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Chance Chat At Work Leads to Blog Revival: Quantum Cascade Laser Tests Blood Sugar Without Finger Pricks

Happy New Year to all my Type 1 diabetes friends and #DOC community. After a long, long blogging vacation … I’m back to writing again thanks to a chance chat with a colleague at work today.

Princeton Researchers Use Lasers to Measure Blood Sugars

Members of the research team test the new laser system. Images courtesy of Frank Wojciechowski/Princeton University.

It was a completely unscripted meeting. As I was in the men’s restroom testing my blood sugar at work, Jonathan walks in, sees me and my bright red blood spot on my test strip. Then he asks: how many times a day did I ” prick my finger” for a blood drop to test my glucose. My normal answer: 8 to 10 times a day. Then I stop myself wondering if we’ve got a connection?

After a few soundbites about testing, insulin pumps, CGMs and all the standard stuff from me — Jonathan pauses and says: “Before I came here I was working in a research group at Princeton that is working to use lasers to accurately measure blood sugar without needing a finger prick,” he said.

Dramatic pause. The sound you heard is my jaw dropping and hitting the bathroom counter. First time I’d ever heard this possibility. The possibility of fewer finger pricks for blood testing is a dream for all of us T1Ds. Wave a magic wand or light beam over your finger and the BG results sync up with my soon-to-be-real Artificial Pancreas closed-loop technology!  Wow, my mind is now racing and I’m back in the blogging game. Here’s the link to the full story. Read it and let me know if you’ve heard of this research?  Together, We R the Cure for Type 1 diabetes and its serious medical complications!!

A team from Princeton University has developed the new technique, which measures blood sugar by directing an IR quantum cascade laser at a person’s palm. The laser light is partially absorbed by sugar molecules in the patient’s body; the amount of absorption is used to measure the level of blood sugar.

According to the researchers, the results indicated that the laser measurement readings produced average errors that were somewhat larger than standard blood sugar monitors, but remained within the clinical requirement for accuracy. In measuring blood glucose levels, readings must be within 20 percent of the patient’s actual blood sugar level. The new system has demonstrated 84 percent accuracy.

“We are working hard to turn engineering solutions into useful tools for people to use in their daily lives,” said Claire Gmachl, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Electrical Engineering and the project’s senior researcher. “With this work we hope to improve the lives of many diabetes sufferers who depend on frequent blood glucose monitoring.”


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Mathematics, Mary Tyler Moore and Standard Deviation, Part 2: Looking for the Type 1 Auto Pilot Easy Button

One of the all-time great movie quotes, from Airplane circa 1980s, actually fits perfect for persons living with Type 1 diabetes who keep looking for a qualified pilot or Auto Pilot “Easy Button” to help them fly safe and keep their complex human body on course:

Photo of Auto Pilot Easy Button to push for diabetets control

Managing Type 1 diabetes is like flying a complex jet airplane. What we need is an Auto Pilot Easy Button to keep us flying level and safe.

“All right, Striker, you listen, and listen close. Flying a plane is no different from riding a bicycle; it’s just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the spokes.”

The more you know about your own diabetes, the less you understand. The more time you spend managing your diabetes, using the latest technology tools, aiming for a lower A1c and a lower Standard Deviation, logging in and learning from the Diabetes Online Community (DOC) — the less you actually comprehend about a chronic disease that is, actually, almost impossible to control. There is no Auto Pilot button in the T1D cockpit.

In the first four months of 2014, I’ve been hyper-focused or rededicated to my diabetes management. Thanks to my new tech partner, the Dexcom “Studio” reporting app, I’ve been monitoring my hourly, daily and weekly trends, adjusting basel and bolus rates based on pattern or trend lines,  and charting my own “success report” or flight plan.  Of course, a true “success report” for Type 1Ds would show a TAB that says: “CURED.” Sorry, but I have not found this category yet on the Dexcom app.

If you’re looking for good news, here it is: My quarterly check up in April produced my best A1c number in almost 2 years — a 7.5 A1c! This is down from my 7.8 A1c in January, and my better-than-average result also produced a Standard Deviation number of 51 for April — way, way down from my Feb/March SDs in the high 60s.  I am thrilled with the current trend line and I better understand how hard work, diet and exercise, paying attention to the mathematics of diabetes and some luck produces better blood glucose control and fewer serious medical complications. This cause-and-effect was established in  the landmark DCCT study done more than two decades ago. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) showed that keeping blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible slows the onset and progression of the eye, kidney, and nerve damage caused by diabetes. In fact, it demonstrated that any sustained lowering of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, helps, even if the person has a history of poor control.

However, here’s where the mathematics, Mary Tyler Moore and standard deviation come back into the story:

How can anyone spend 24/7, 365 days a year — every year for the rest of my life — working this hard at a full-time job that brings with it no pay, no days off, no miracle cures,  and the uncertainty that better blucose control– the goal is under 7.0  A1c — actually reduces medical complications?  As the Mary Tyler Moore TV theme song might actually ask: “You might just make it after all?”

Despite my recent well-earned success, my monthly and quarterly results still show that I’m still spending about 30% of my days ” out of my target” blood glucose zone ( 80 to 170) and, therefore, I still have not achieved true “control”  and may face potential health risks as I age.

Graph showing my Diabetes Glucose Control

My Dexcom Success Report shows better “In Target” results but shows I’ve still got a long way to go to achieve auto glucose control over my Type 1 Diabetes.

Here’s what my flight crew told me this month about my Type 1 Diabetes and how I’m doing on my journey toward better, healthier outcomes.

My Endocrinologist: “I don’t look for a certain standard deviation number, whether that’s 50 or lower. The key is to get the number as low as possible.  Your A1c is moving in the right direction but it needs to be lower.”

My Dietitian — first time I’ve met with one in 10 years. “People with Type 1 have all these numbers running around in their heads. They are constantly thinking about glucose numbers, A1Cs,  carbohydrates and is their trend line going up and down. I think it gets to be a little overwhelming at times. You should give yourself some credit because you are managing things that a person with a normal, functioning pancreas never thinks twice about. My glucose numbers may be the same as yours in a given day, but I don’t spend a minute thinking about it because my pancreas is doing it for me.”

My Dexcom Rep who is also a Type 1 diabetic — “The most important goal is more stable blood sugars. Our goal should be below 50. Even below 40. Our bodies like stability. There is a lot more to diabetes than just controlling one measurement or number. There are so many factors and stress is one of the biggest. If you have a good day and your numbers are improving, that’s a good thing. But some of this is really out of our hands.  We are humans after all.”

I turn to technology to help best manage my diabetes because my pancreas stopped making insulin almost two decades ago, and these advances in treatment have improved my quality of life immeasurably in some ways (emotional health) and very measurably in others (better blood sugar control). The technology we need now is the Auto Pilot Easy Button — or the Artificial Pancreas closed loop system. Push it and it’ll be almost like your pancreas is flying the plane again.


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What Does It Feel Like To Test Your Blood Sugar 8 Times Every Day: My Day of Finger Pricks

A few years ago, a child under the age of 9 years presented this to a room full of adults at a JDRF fundraiser in Richmond, VA. Her concise and beautiful talk captivated the room. It says a lot about the daily grind of a child, a parent caring for a child, or an adult living with Type 1 diabetes. More than 3 million Americans face this daily Type 1 D drama in order to stay alive.

Finger Pricks

Try this. What does it feel like to test your blood sugar or take an insulin shot — 8 times a day.

As 2012 ends and 2013 begins, it’s time to energize We R the Cure. Here’s my starting point.

I encourage you to try this simple yet realistic “day in the life” of a person living with diabetes. To feel what it’s like to test your blood sugar like me, put a rubber band around your wrist and snap it each time you see my handprint or needle. Eight times or more a day.

  1. I woke up low at 2 AM. Mom had to check me. Finger Stick.
  2. Check before breakfast and my first shot.
  3. Gym today. The nurse checks me before I can participate.
  4. Mom or I check before lunchtime. Finger Stick. Shot.
  5. Soccer practice after school. Finger Stick.
  6. Suppertime. Finger Stick. Shot.
  7. Before Bedtime. Finger Stick. Snack or Shot.
  8. Bedtime. Finger Stick. Snack or Shot. I am OK.