We R the Cure

Seeking Cures and Cheating Destiny


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Turning Type 1 Diabetes into Type None: I’m wearing biker shorts (Ugh) and riding for a cure

Hello Friends and Supporters of Type 1 Diabetes research!

JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes

Why do we ride? We ride to raise research funds so that Daniel Majikes, left, has hope for a brighter future and a real cure for Type 1 diabetes. Daniel and I will ride together in Vermont on July 26.

I’m taking part in the JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes in Vermont this July, along with hundreds of riders from around the world, to raise money for JDRF, the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. My training is designed so I can ride up to 100 miles on a bike — I’m not a cyclist but I am a biker with a mission.

So far, I’m up to 29 miles of weekly bike training and heading toward a busy July riding the back roads of Goochland County — which is a beautiful area to ride. As Jackson Browne sings, “Looking at the road rushing under my wheels … Running on Empty … but I’m running on.”

Click here to visit my personal page.

I received my Type 1D diagnosis — from out of nowhere — in May 1998. That is 16 years this May 2014. It’s been a real up-and-down journey since that unfortunate starting line when my fasting blood sugar was 500+ as I sat in the exam room at Chester Family Physicians.

Today, 16 years later, I count only my blessings for all the good things that have happened to me on my journey to a cure. It’s the Type 1D people — Drew, Lauri, Daniel, Linda, Matthew, William, Susan, Fred, Tony, Kevin, Patti, Trish, Shea, Sarah, JP, Liesl, Molly, Mary, Laura, Boris, Danny, Sue, Stacy, Nicole, Kathy, Ned, Chris, Eva, Cecil, Cheryl, Larry, Melanie, Kim, Hillary, Doran, McKenzie, Sandra, Connie, Kailee, Nathan, Tom, Kim, Tiffany, Andrew and all my fellow JDRF volunteers too numerous to list — that’s why we ride.

We do ALL this for each other. We do it for ourselves. We do it for our friends and loved ones. We do it for my aunt Mary Jane, a Joslin Medalist who’s lived with Type 1 Diabetes for 70+ years and is still kicking – despite having both feet amputated due to diabetes complications. And we do it for the next generation of children and adults who have not been diagnosed yet.

Today, I’m making my biggest commitment yet. I have joined Coach Matthew Majikes and the Central Virginia Ride to Cure Diabetes team. Our goal is simple: To train together as a team, enjoy our time together, and cycle up to 100 miles in Burlington, Vermont July 24-27 to raise awareness and dollars for research that will improve the quality of life for children, teens and adults living with this chronic disease.  And one day soon — our efforts will generate a quality of life cure like the Artificial Pancreas and the ultimate goal, a medical cure that reverses or stops Type 1 diabetes in its tracks.

Will you help me on my road to a cure?

JDRF is working every day to fund critical diabetes research. And every dollar I raise helps them continue to bring life-changing therapies from the lab to the community until a cure is found. I’m  entering my second month of training on my bike. Please check back to view my fundraising progress as my Ride weekend approaches.

Can you make a donation of $25, $30 or more today? Your support, both financially and emotionally, is greatly appreciated. Please consider making an online donation today. Thank you. Together, We Are The Cure.

Mike Anderson

Click here to visit my personal page.

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Should Type 1 Diabetes Advocates Have Sharp Elbows? Status Quo or Act Up — What is the right pathway?

What does advocacy mean? Is someone who advocates for a cause they believe in — not to be confused with a paid advocate — actually able to make things better, to make change happen at a local, regional or national level? Well, it’s time to find out.

Image for Diabetes Advocates

I am a new member of Diabetes Advocates. Excited to be an advocate. What can we achieve together?

I did not prepare a speech, but I am very honored and excited to have my membership application accepted by the Diabetes Advocates non-profit group. Thank you to the Academy!

The question for me to answer is — how do I actively participate and how do I add my time and voice to the growing chorus of Diabetes Online Community (#DOC) leaders who are real people, not actors on TV, who wake up each day with Type 1 Diabetes and envision a better future for themselves and the next generation of Americans who get this game-changing diagnosis. The DOC has done great things for all of us connected to diabetes.

Are we advocates or practical agitators. Or something in between? The recent article in Insulin Nation about The Juvenile Diabetes Cure Alliance (JDCA) — Practical Cure Advocates — should make all of us stop and think. What change do we advocate for? If we want more human clinical trials, higher-tech technology and a medical cure for Type 1 diabetes — it’s up to us to make it happen.

“Scientists have made careers in proving a concept in mice…we want to push against that gravitational pull” of mouse-only research, Phil Shaw of the JDCA told Insulin Nation.

I’ve been a volunteer and fundraiser for many years with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation — the Central Virginia Chapter. Thru my volunteer work I’ve met some incredible children, teens, adults and selfless parents — and developed friendships with some of the best people I’ve ever met — the people you wish you never had the good fortune to meet. I’ve also been a participant in and an advocate for human clinical trials, and I see how the money raised for Type 1 research does make a difference in our daily lives. However, no matter how hard we all push, we’re still waiting for  better tech, better solutions and a future free from Type 1.

For today, it is my honor to be a new DA and to proudly post the group’s goals. Tomorrow is a new day. Together we are stronger.

Diabetes Advocates is a program of the Diabetes Hands Foundation, a nonprofit organization that brings together people touched by diabetes for positive change so that nobody living with this condition ever feels alone.

Mission
To connect advocates dedicated to improving the lives of people living with diabetes in order to accelerate and amplify their efforts

Goals 2013-2015
1. Continue growing the reach and impact of the program, by:

  • Creating paths for diabetes advocacy for members of the diabetes online community.
  • Increasing the number of Diabetes Advocates members focused on type 2 diabetes.
  • Increasing the number of Spanish-speaking Diabetes Advocates members.
  • Increasing awareness about Diabetes Advocates, starting with an emphasis in the US.

2. Increase the measurable impact of the program through:

  • Increasing member engagement in Diabetes Advocates initiatives.
  • Expanding benefits that impact sustainability and member development.
  • Hosting an annual Diabetes Advocacy Congress.
  • Consolidate Diabetes Advocates as a hub for collaboration among diabetes advocates.


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Clinical Studies Are Recruiting for Participants; We R the Cure — Is It Your Time?

A clinical study involves research using human volunteers (also called participants) that is intended to add to medical knowledge.

Before leaving UVa and giving back the AP, I pose with a few of the team members who watched over me and conducted the outpatient trial. L to R: my nurse, Crystal Leathers, computer engineer Benton MIze, and Stacey Anderson, MD.

Before leaving UVa and giving back the AP, I pose with a few of the team members who watched over me and conducted the outpatient trial. L to R: my nurse, Crystal Leathers, computer engineer Benton Mize, and Stacey Anderson, MD.

There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials and observational studies. ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational studies.

Searching for a Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial? Check out the current list of trials in the United States.  Searching for a Type 2 diabetes clinical trial?  Click this link.


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Spare A Rose, Save A Child : Can You Spare $5 or More To Deliver Insulin

Sometimes, all you have to do is Stop, Look, and Listen. Then you see the blessings surrounding you and give thanks.

Visit Spare A Rose Save A Child website to donate

Click here or visit http://www.p4dc.com/spare-a-rose/ for more information

I have several unopened vials of Insulin in my refrigerator waiting to be used thanks to my health insurance and my co-pays. It still costs too much. However, I have it. Without insulin, persons with Type 1 diabetes would look pretty darn weak, sick or worse. But that’s another story for another day. Today, it’s time to raise some awareness.

The International Diabetes Federation runs a program called Life for a Child. Life for a Child provides insulin as well as other diabetes supplies and education to more than 12,000 impoverished children living in 43 developing countries. Without this help, there is a good chance they would not survive. In some areas, the life expectancy of a child with type 1 diabetes is less than one year.

In honor of Valentine’s Day, the Diabetes Online Community is spreading the news about the “Spare a Rose, Save a Child” campaign encouraging people to spend the amount they would spend on one rose to save the life of one child. Just five dollars will help support a child for a month. A dozen roses would help a child for a year. The IDF’s goal for 2014 is to raise $10,000!

Insulin was first invented in 1921. It’s not a cure, but no one should die from diabetes in 2014 because of lack of insulin. Insulin is available. So let’s get it to those who need it most. Thanks for your help!


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Researchers Agree: The Status Quo Is Not Acceptable; We Need More Clinical Trial Participants To Drive Progress

Imagine my surprise and excitement when a leading Type 1 diabetes researcher, Dr. Desmond Schatz of the University of Florida, unofficially promoted our “We R The Cure” blog site during the JDRF Type 1 Diabetes Research Summit on Feb. 18, 2012. Let’s roll the audio tape:

We R the cure JDRF walk team

We R the Cure — and so are you. Sign up for a clinical trial today.

“We do not have enough people participating in research studies,” Dr. Schatz told several hundred Type 1D enthusiasts in his opening statements. “My goal is to give you hope, to inspire hope, and to push you to get involved. Without U, there can be no cure.” Almost on cue, an outburst of applause came from the adjacent ballroom where young children with Type 1 diabetes were playing and having fun while their parents attended the JDRF Summit. Dr. Schatz heard the applause and laughed. “I am here to make it clear, that the status quo (in Type 1 research) is unacceptable!” And again, the children cheered right on cue.

This blog is dedicated to the patients, doctors, nurses, researchers and big thinkers who are actively pushing research forward – in our search for solutions & cures for persons living with auto immune disorders such as type 1 diabetes and certain forms of cancer that are tied indirectly to weakened immune systems or a virus attack. If you’re ready to learn more or join a clinical trial, check back here often for news and information. Or simply click on Clinical Trials to get started.

My name is Mike Anderson, and I am the creator and editor of We R The Cure. I received my Type 1D diagnosis — from out of nowhere — in May 1998. Together with my friends and family, I am a passionate advocate for raising awareness and raising dollars for research and real solutions that will improve the quality of life for children, teens and adults living with this chronic disease. And one day — A cure or many cures.

A clinical study involves research using human volunteers (also called participants) that is intended to add to medical knowledge.  There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials and observational studies.    ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational studies. So, what R U waiting for … Think about joining a clinical trial in 2014. It’s a new year’s resolution that is worth keeping. Thanks for your participation. werthecure.com


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Diabetes Technology: What Patients Really Want — The Video


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What Does It Feel Like To Test Your Blood Sugar 8 Times Every Day: My Day of Finger Pricks

A few years ago, a child under the age of 9 years presented this to a room full of adults at a JDRF fundraiser in Richmond, VA. Her concise and beautiful talk captivated the room. It says a lot about the daily grind of a child, a parent caring for a child, or an adult living with Type 1 diabetes. More than 3 million Americans face this daily Type 1 D drama in order to stay alive.

Finger Pricks

Try this. What does it feel like to test your blood sugar or take an insulin shot — 8 times a day.

As 2012 ends and 2013 begins, it’s time to energize We R the Cure. Here’s my starting point.

I encourage you to try this simple yet realistic “day in the life” of a person living with diabetes. To feel what it’s like to test your blood sugar like me, put a rubber band around your wrist and snap it each time you see my handprint or needle. Eight times or more a day.

  1. I woke up low at 2 AM. Mom had to check me. Finger Stick.
  2. Check before breakfast and my first shot.
  3. Gym today. The nurse checks me before I can participate.
  4. Mom or I check before lunchtime. Finger Stick. Shot.
  5. Soccer practice after school. Finger Stick.
  6. Suppertime. Finger Stick. Shot.
  7. Before Bedtime. Finger Stick. Snack or Shot.
  8. Bedtime. Finger Stick. Snack or Shot. I am OK.