We R the Cure

Seeking Cures and Cheating Destiny


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Chance Chat At Work Leads to Blog Revival: Quantum Cascade Laser Tests Blood Sugar Without Finger Pricks

Happy New Year to all my Type 1 diabetes friends and #DOC community. After a long, long blogging vacation … I’m back to writing again thanks to a chance chat with a colleague at work today.

Princeton Researchers Use Lasers to Measure Blood Sugars

Members of the research team test the new laser system. Images courtesy of Frank Wojciechowski/Princeton University.

It was a completely unscripted meeting. As I was in the men’s restroom testing my blood sugar at work, Jonathan walks in, sees me and my bright red blood spot on my test strip. Then he asks: how many times a day did I ” prick my finger” for a blood drop to test my glucose. My normal answer: 8 to 10 times a day. Then I stop myself wondering if we’ve got a connection?

After a few soundbites about testing, insulin pumps, CGMs and all the standard stuff from me — Jonathan pauses and says: “Before I came here I was working in a research group at Princeton that is working to use lasers to accurately measure blood sugar without needing a finger prick,” he said.

Dramatic pause. The sound you heard is my jaw dropping and hitting the bathroom counter. First time I’d ever heard this possibility. The possibility of fewer finger pricks for blood testing is a dream for all of us T1Ds. Wave a magic wand or light beam over your finger and the BG results sync up with my soon-to-be-real Artificial Pancreas closed-loop technology!  Wow, my mind is now racing and I’m back in the blogging game. Here’s the link to the full story. Read it and let me know if you’ve heard of this research?  Together, We R the Cure for Type 1 diabetes and its serious medical complications!!

A team from Princeton University has developed the new technique, which measures blood sugar by directing an IR quantum cascade laser at a person’s palm. The laser light is partially absorbed by sugar molecules in the patient’s body; the amount of absorption is used to measure the level of blood sugar.

According to the researchers, the results indicated that the laser measurement readings produced average errors that were somewhat larger than standard blood sugar monitors, but remained within the clinical requirement for accuracy. In measuring blood glucose levels, readings must be within 20 percent of the patient’s actual blood sugar level. The new system has demonstrated 84 percent accuracy.

“We are working hard to turn engineering solutions into useful tools for people to use in their daily lives,” said Claire Gmachl, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Electrical Engineering and the project’s senior researcher. “With this work we hope to improve the lives of many diabetes sufferers who depend on frequent blood glucose monitoring.”

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JDRF Research News: Specific Protein May Help Beta Cells Survive in Type 1 Diabetes

JDRF-funded researchers find therapeutic potential of MANF protein to reduce beta cell stress in type 1 diabetes.

Image for Diabetes Advocates

I am a diabetes advocate. We R the Cure is a blog site dedicated to the persons living with Type 1 diabetes and the clincial researchers who are making positive things happen in our journey to a cure.

In the healthy pancreas of someone without type 1 diabetes (T1D), the hormone insulin (essential for turning food into energy) is produced, stored, and released in a normal “factory-like” process within pancreatic beta cells in response to glucose in the diet.

Early in the course of T1D, however, excessive or pathologic stress in beta cells compromises their ability to properly secrete insulin, triggering a cascade of events ultimately contributing to the beta cell death. Over the past several years, JDRF-funded researchers have found evidence that beta cell stress may play a role in the onset of T1D, and are exploring possible ways to stop it from occurring, thus potentially protecting beta cell health and maintaining normal beta cell function.

In April, JDRF-funded researchers in Finland released new findings in the journal CellPress that add another piece to the puzzle of beta cell stress and T1D.

Post comes from News release published at  http://www.jdrf.org.


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D-Blogweek Post 2: He’s a poet and don’t know it — For Whom the Bell Tolls

Yesterday was Poetry Day for Diabetes Blog Week. So, I’m playing catchup already.

Click on the #Dblogweek buttoin

Diabetes Blog Week — Click to find out more details.

Instead of  trying to be a poet, I think it’s wiser to reprint something that fits a certain viewpoint — how Type 1s are living with a chronic disease that ticks, ticks, ticks in the back of our mind. Healthy looking on the outside, not so healthy on the inside.  Seeking Cures and Cheating our Destiny.  And raging against the machine.

No man is an island,
Entire of itself.
Each is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.
If a clod be washed away by the sea,
Europe is the less.
As well as if a promontory were.
As well as if a manor of thine own
Or of thine friend’s were.
Each man’s death diminishes me,
For I am involved in mankind.
Therefore, send not to know
For whom the bell tolls,
It tolls for thee.

These famous words by John Donne were not originally written as a poem – the passage is taken from the 1624 Meditation 17, from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and is prose. The words of the original passage are as follows:

John Donne
Meditation 17
Devotions upon Emergent Occasions

“No man is an iland, intire of it selfe; every man is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine; if a clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were, as well as if a Mannor of thy friends or of thine owne were; any mans death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankinde; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee….”


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D-Blog Week is back in 2014; Goal is to connect, share our hopes, and change the Diabetes World

For the 5th year in a row, diabetes online writers from all over the world will be participating in a solid week’s worth of informative, educational, and inspirational blog posts. To find out everything you need to know about Diabetes Blog Week, click on the button to the right.

Click on the #Dblogweek buttoin

Diabetes Blog Week — Click to find out more details.

Can you join a blog party that’s already been going on for 5 years?

Yes, I’m going to jump in for the first time ever this week. That’s 7 blog posts in 7 days. OMG.  Let’s get the party started.

Today’s topic: Change the World – Monday 5/12

Let’s kick off Diabetes Blog Week by talking about the diabetes causes and issues that really get us fired up. Are you passionate about 504 plans and school safety? Do diabetes misconceptions irk you? Do you fight for CGM coverage for Medicare patients, SDP funding, or test strip accuracy? Do you work hard at creating diabetes connections and bringing support? Whether or not you “formally” advocate for any cause, share the issues that are important to you. (Thanks go out to Kim of Texting my Pancreas for inspiring this topic.)

Changing the world?

A few years ago, I won’t say how many, a very “Zen” co-worker of mine was fond of quoting inspirational slogans to inspire team members to overcome our every day, routine work challenges. At the time, my personal guru was a very non-Zen spiritual leader named Vince Lombardi, legendary head coach of my Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers.

Needless to say, we didn’t have a lot in common. Funny thing, two decades later — after spending many days, weeks, months  and years working with volunteers at the local and state level to raise awareness and the critical funds for Type 1 diabetes research — I can admit it: My co-worker was right in sharing his quotes with us. With a shout out to my former colleague, Karl Bren, here’s the quote that fits perfectly with the diabetes online community (DOC) perspective:

“Never believe that a few caring people can’t change the world. For indeed that’s all who ever have. ”
Margaret Mead, The World Ahead: An Anthropologist Anticipates the Future    

So, if the Genie stopped by today and granted me 3 practical — not magical — wishes to change the diabetes world — here’s what I’d want to make happen:

  1. Remove the FDA’s ability to delay or drag its bureaucratic feet — to block cutting-edge insulin pump technology that is being used successfully in Europe.  Bring it to the USA. Now.
  2. Remove roadblocks so we can expand the research and exploration into stem cells and regeneration technology like the efforts now underway in California by ViaCyte. Let’s “wake up our unemployed pancreas” and bring it back to full employment producing beta cells and the insulin we need ON Command. (A related side wish — Bring back the missing limbs, bring sight back to the blind, and restore full health to the persons who’ve lived with Type 1 diabetes for decades and lost a few rounds with the killer. This one’s for you, Aunt Mary Jane!)
  3. Ask everyone to stop blogging, tweeting, snap chatting and every social media form of expression for 1 year — and go visit their next-door neighbor, siblings, family members, strangers and find ways to improve your own piece of the world. What’s your passion? What problems plague your community? If you have diabetes, cancer or any life-threatening disease — see if it makes sense  for you to volunteer for a human clinical trial. Jump in and encourage others to do the same. We need more trials so we can stop curing Mice With Diabetes and focus on Persons With Diabetes.

We are the world, we are the children, We are the ones who make a brighter day, So let’s start giving. There’s a choice we’re making, We’re saving our own lives. It’s true we’ll make a better day, Just you and me … We R the Cure!”

It’s Diabetes Blog Week, and this entry is for the “Change the World” topic.  For more on Diabetes Blog Week, including participants and topics, click on the respective links.  It’s not too late to join in the fun – jump in now!


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HealthLine.Com Ranks Top 17 Best Blogs: Passionate Type 1’s Educate And Chronicle Their Struggles, Successes

Diabetes is a condition that affects millions of people around the world. Several eloquent and compassionate people who face diabetes have chosen to write about their experiences in blog form, chronicling both their struggles and their successes. In addition to being compelling reading, these bloggers’ stories bring together the online community of those whose lives are affected by diabetes.

After poring over many, many diabetes blogs, looking for the best of the bunch, we have collected seventeen of the best diabetes blogs for you to read. We trust that you will find these bloggers’ writings and experiences to be sources of both helpful information and hope. The Diabetes Online Community #DOC is a great source of support for me. Together, We R the Cure!

Published March 29, 2012
Written by Leah Snyder